Nine Weird and Wonderful Facts About Death and Funerals

Nine Weird and Wonderful Facts About Death and Funerals

Despite their reputation, funeral directors are not vile vampires. There are no rogues’ galleries lining the corridors of funeral homes. The majority of funeral directors are just ordinary people with lives, families and feelings. These nine weird and wonderful facts about death and funerals will make you want to have a cremation yourself. Read on for a few fascinating facts. Besides, it’s not as if dead bodies don’t sit up when they’re dead!

Funeral Leads

In Papua New Guinea, some people exhume the bodies of their loved ones. The Dani People, Wari, and Yanomami people do this to ward off evil spirits. In the Philippines, the Sagada believe that the higher the coffin is, the closer the dead will be to heaven. In Madagascar, the Malagasy people eat the dead to ward off fear and make them happy.

Some cultures believe that the way a person dies affects his or her afterlife. In some cultures, burial methods reflect religious beliefs. Even the history of the coffin is filled with strange facts. For instance, a mummy with a battery inside could explode during the cremation process. Several cultures have customs and rituals that revolve around death and funeral. In some parts of the world, the manner in which a person is buried also has a strong impact on the afterlife of the departed.

Some cultures have special rituals when it comes to burial. For example, the Haida people of North America had a special ritual to celebrate their dead. They crushed their shamans and chiefs with clubs and then placed their corpses in a box on the mortuary totem pole in front of their homes. The suitcases were then hung on a tree to symbolize the dead person’s life.

Various cultures around the world have unusual ways of honoring their dead. In Papua New Guinea, the Dani People eat their dead relatives. In the Philippines, the Sagada people believe that a coffin’s height indicates a person’s proximity to heaven. In Madagascar, the Malagasy people bury their dead loved ones every seven years. The process is called the mortuary totem pole.

In North America, the Haida people had a unique funeral ritual. They would crush their shamans or chiefs to pulp using clubs. Their corpses were then placed in suitcases and placed on the mortuary totem pole in front of their home. Afterward, they would bury the bodies and perform the rituals. These practices are considered to be a part of their culture and are not to be taken lightly.

While most cultures have their own rituals, there are also a few oddities that can make death and funerals even more interesting. In Papua New Guinea, the people bury their dead. Their bodies are mummified. Their bodies are then placed in a sarcophagus. They are then buried in the pyramids. In the Philippines, the Sagada people believe that they should place their coffins high up in the mountains. This is believed to be closer to heaven. In South Korea, the dead are eaten by themselves.

Some people in the world believe that the way a person is buried has an influence on their afterlife. In Papua New Guinea, for example, people eat dead bodies. In Brazil, some people bury the dead on the beach. They also believe that the remains should be scattered on the seafloor. However, these practices are forbidden in the United States. And, in the Philippines, the Sagada bury their dead high up in the mountains to make them appear closer to heaven.

Many cultures have strange rituals for burying their dead. For example, the Haida of North America had a unique way of burying its chiefs. The dead were put into a wooden box that was placed on a totem pole outside the home. This is a rite of respect for the deceased. In Papua New Guinea, a similar tradition is observed.